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Booth Theatre

I'll Eat You Last: A Chat With Sue Mengers

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I'll Eat You Last: A Chat With Sue Mengers, Booth Theatre, NYC Show Poster
Booth Theatre

222 West 45th Street
New York, NY 10036

1hr, 30mins
Important Dates
On Sale
Mar 15, 2013
Apr 05, 2013
Apr 24, 2013
Jun 30, 2013
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Critics’ Reviews

The role fits Midler like a glove and she does not disappoint under Joe Mantello's direction. And anyone who likes both Midler and gossip about 1970s Hollywood ought to have a good time.

Review by Matt Windman from AM NY

Under Joe Mantello's pitch-perfect direction, Midler dives into the role with predictable relish -- which is not to say that she chews the scenery. However brassy her persona, Mengers clearly valued taste and discretion, as Pask's spacious, elegant scenic reminds us. Holding court over an audience whose members, as she repeatedly informs us, aren't nearly distinguished enough to warrant an invitation to her house, the actress brings an element of wry detachment to even some more personal observations.

Review by Elysa Gardner from USA Today

Midler's consummate ability to deliver brassy chutzpah, fierceness and silky comic seduction at the same time is harnessed to perfection, allowing just a judicious whisper of vulnerability. Infusing her performance with equal parts Sue and Bette, plus a dash of her old Sophie Tucker routines, she makes this role her bitch.

Review by David Rooney from The Hollywood Reporter

As a performer [Midler] shares certain qualities associated with her subject: an ability to make the crassest vulgarities sound like crystalline repartee, an earthy glamour and a preening, kittenish imperiousness that's somehow warmly endearing. It is hard to imagine any other actor imbuing the character with the same seductive effervescence - or giving a feeling of perpetual motion to a 90-minute monologue without even standing up.

Review by Charles Isherwood from The New York Times