The Other Place - Broadway

Laurie Metcalf stars in Manhattan Theatre Club's production of Sharr White's drama.

Story

What Is the Story of The Other Place?
The Other Place is the puzzling and darkly comedic story of Juliana Smithton, a brilliant neurologist whose mind betrays her just as she is on the verge of developing a new drug designed to treat dementia. Juliana’s life begins to fall apart as her husband Ian has filed for divorce, her daughter has eloped with a much older man and her own health is in jeopardy. Memory is a tricky thing, and Juliana becomes confused by her own memories…but she doesn’t know anything’s wrong. However, when Juliana makes a presentation on the drug to a group of doctors, she, her family and the audience begin to sense that she may be suffering from the very disease she’s trying to cure.

 

Should I See It?

What Is The Other Place Like?
Nothing is as it seems in Sharr White’s new play. Piece by piece, a mystery unfolds as fact blurs with fiction, past collides with present and the elusive truth about Juliana Smithton, played by Emmy winner and Tony nominee Laurie Metcalf, boils to the surface. We spend most of the play in Juliana's head, but even her first-person narration doesn't always add up, and the suspense builds throughout the play's 80-minute running time. Just when you think you understand what’s really going on in the story of this brilliant scientist’s life, along comes new information or a trip to the past that changes what you thought you knew. The captivating Metcalf remains on stage the entire time, and Joe Mantello’s fluid direction is enhanced by a series of video projections. If you've been longing for a juicy Broadway play with a fabulous star performance, this is the show for you.

Is The Other Place Good For Kids?
No. Although there is no nudity, violence or simulated drug use, The Other Place contains adult themes and some language that is inappropriate for children. The production may be a good choice for older, mature teens, but see The Other Place first to determine whether the adult subject matter is appropriate.