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Paradise Square Show Poster

Paradise Square Tickets

Ethel Barrymore Theatre

A new musical telling the galvanizing story of racial harmony undone by a country at war with itself.

Tickets starting at $39.00
Tue
Mar 15
8:00pm
Wed
Mar 16
2:00pm 7:30pm
Thu
Mar 17
8:00pm
Fri
Mar 18
8:00pm
Sat
Mar 19
2:00pm 8:00pm
Sun
Mar 20

No Performances

Mon
Mar 21

No Performances

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Ethel Barrymore Theatre

243 West 47th Street
New York, NY 10036

Previews Mar 15, 2022
Opening Apr 3, 2022

Story

Set in 1863, this is a galvanizing story of racial harmony undone by a country at war with itself, we meet the denizens of a local saloon called Paradise Square: Nelly Freeman, the indomitable Black woman who owns it; Annie O’Brien, her Irish-Catholic sister-in-law and her Black minister husband, Rev. Samuel Jacob Lewis; Owen Duignan, a conflicted newly arrived Irish immigrant; Washington Henry, a fearless freedom seeker; Frederic Tiggens, an anti-abolitionist political boss, and Milton Moore, a penniless songwriter trying to capture it all. They have conflicting notions of what it means to be an American while living through one of the most tumultuous eras in our country’s history.

Know Before You Go

As the Civil War raged on in 1863 New York City, an extraordinary thing occurred amid the dangerous streets and crumbling tenement houses of the Five Points, the notorious 19th-century Lower Manhattan slum. For many years, Irish immigrants escaping the devastation of the Great Famine settled alongside free-born Black Americans and those who escaped slavery, arriving by means of the Underground Railroad. The Irish, relegated at that time to the lowest rung of America’s social status, received a sympathetic welcome from their Black neighbors (who enjoyed only slightly better treatment in the burgeoning industrial-era city). The two communities co-existed, intermarried, raised families, and shared their cultures in this unlikeliest of neighborhoods.

The amalgamation between the communities took its most exuberant form with raucous dance contests on the floors of the neighborhood bars and dance halls. It is here in the Five Points where tap dancing was born, as Irish step dancing joyously competed with Black American Juba. But this racial equilibrium would come to a sharp and brutal end when President Lincoln’s need to institute the first Federal Draft to support the Union Army would incite the deadly NY Draft Riots of July 1863.

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